Old Fashioned Chess Pie

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9 inch single pie crust
2 cups sugar
2 tablespoons flour
½ cup butter, melted
4 eggs, beaten well
½ teaspoon vanilla extract

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.  Line a 9-inch pie pan with crust and then crimp the edges decoratively.

In a large bowl, combine the sugar and flour, mix well. Add the butter, eggs, and vanilla. Stir well to combine everything into a smooth, thick filling. Pour the filling into the piecrust.

Place the pie on the bottom shelf of the oven. Bake for 10 minutes. Lower the heat to 350 degrees, and bake until the center is fairly firm, wiggling only a little when you gently nudge the pan, 30 to 40 minutes.

Place the pie on a cooling rack and let cool to room temperature.

Enjoy!

 

“Colonial Williamsburg” Inspired Cream Of Peanut Soup

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¼ cup unsalted butter
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 celery ribs, finely chopped
3 tablespoons flour
8 cups Chicken Stock
2 cups smooth peanut butter
1 ¾ cups half-and-half
Finely chopped salted peanuts, for garnish

In a large saucepan over medium heat, melt the butter. Add the onion and celery and cook, until softened, about five minutes.

Stir in flour and cook two or three minutes longer.

Pour in the chicken stock, increase the heat to high, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium and cook, stirring often, until slightly reduced and thickened, about 15 to 20 minutes. Pour into a sieve and strain.  Return the liquid to the sauce pan.

Whisk the peanut butter and the half-and-half into the liquid. Cream can be used for a richer soup.  Warm over low heat, stirring often, for about five minutes. Do not boil.

Serve warm, garnished with the chopped peanuts.

Cornmeal Crusted Catfish

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Oil for frying
2 pounds catfish fillets
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons crab boil seasoning
2 large eggs
½ cup half-and-half
1 tablespoon hot sauce
2 cups coarse-ground cornmeal
Tartar sauce

Heat 1 inch of oil in a Large, deep-sided cast-iron skillet fitted with a frying thermometer to 375˚F.

Rinse the catfish fillets and pat thoroughly dry with paper towels. Cut the fillets in half lengthwise.  Season lightly with salt and pepper and set aside. Combine the flour and crab boil seasoning in a bowl. Beat the eggs with the half-and-half and hot sauce in a second bowl. Place the cornmeal in a third bowl. Dip a piece of catfish in the flour, shaking off excess, then into egg wash, allowing excess to drip away. Roll the fish in cornmeal and slip it into the hot oil 2-3 pieces at a time. Fry the fish for 3 minutes, carefully turn them, and fry for additional 3 minutes more, until golden brown. Transfer to a baking sheet and place in a 200˚F oven to keep warm while you continue to fry batches of fish.

When all the fish is fried, serve immediately with tartar sauce on the side.

Hot Pepper Sauce Shaved Ice Oyster

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1 standard 5-ounce bottle Tabasco or favorite hot sauce
¼ cup simple syrup
1 cup water

Simple Syrup

Pour 1 cup of sugar and 1 cup of water in a saucepan and bring to a boil.  Stir until sugar is dissolved completely.  Cool.

Directions 
Combine all ingredients in a bowl and mix well. Pour into a wide and shallow container and freeze. When thoroughly frozen, scrape with a fork to create a shaved ice.

Horseradish Shaved Ice Oyster

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1¼ cups prepared horseradish
½ cup vinegar, preferably champagne
⅓ cup simple syrup
1¼ cups water

Simple Syrup

Pour 1 cup of sugar and 1 cup of water in a saucepan and bring to a boil.  Stir until sugar is dissolved completely.  Cool.

Directions

Combine all ingredients in a blender and blend thoroughly. Strain onto a wide and shallow container and freeze. When thoroughly frozen, scrape with a fork to create a shaved ice.  Serve on oysters immediately.

 

Sweet Potato Pie

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Pastry for a 9’inch single crust
1 cup sugar
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg
¼ teaspoon salt
1¼ cups evaporated milk or half-and-half
2 eggs, beaten well
1½ cups mashed, cooked sweet potatoes
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Heat the oven to 375 degrees F. Line a 9-inch pie pan with crust and then crimp the edges decoratively.

Combine the sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt in a large bowl. Use a whisk to stir them together well. Add the milk and eggs, and stir to mix everything together evenly. Add the sweet potatoes, butter, and vanilla. Mix them together well, stirring them into the egg mixture carefully, until you have a thick, smooth, and evenly combined pie filling.

Pour the filling into the piecrust and place it on the middle rack of the oven. Bake until the edges puff up and the center is fairly firm, wiggling only a little when you gently nudge the pan, 50 to 55 minutes.

Place the pie on a cooling rack and let cool for 30 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature.

 

Most Admired: Rie Munoz

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Rie Munoz (1921-2015)

Rie Munoz is an Alaskan artist that was born and raised in California. In 1951 she went on vacation to Alaska, traveling the inside passage by steamship she arrived at Juneau. She fell in love with Juneau and gave herself one day to find a job and a place to live before the steamship left. She landed a newspaper job, a place to live and Alaska has been her home since.

Over the years she has lived in many small Alaskan communities and held numerous jobs, among them journalist, teacher, museum curator and artist. In 1951 she held the position of a teacher on King Island where she taught twenty-five Eskimo children. This time in her life is featured in the January 1954 issue of National Geographic. Her paintings reflect her interest and fascination with day-to-day Alaskan activities such as village life, whaling, fishing both sport and commercial, berry picking, children playing, folklore and legends.

In 1972 she devoted herself fulltime to art and she began to publish full color reproductions of a small number of her watercolors. She produced about sixty originals a year. Over the years I have collected several of her reproductions. She describes her artwork:

“My artwork can best be described as expressionism. The term applies to work that rejects camera snapshot realism, and instead, expresses emotion by distortion and strong colors. My paintings reflect an interest in the day-to-day activities of Alaskans such as fishing, berry picking, children at play, crabbing, and whaling. I am also fascinated with the legends of Alaska’s Native people. While I find much to paint around Juneau, most of my material comes from sketching trips taken to the far corners of Alaska. I’ve taught school on King Island in the Bering Sea, traveled and sketched almost every community in Alaska.”
~ Rie Munoz

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