Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney Found Dead

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Today August 4th in Civil Rights Movement History —> On this day in 1964 civil rights workers Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney are found dead in Mississippi after disappearing on June 21.

The three men: two Jews and an African-American, epitomize the long-gone period when members of these two groups worked together (they were registering black voters in Mississippi: a capital crime!). Eventually seven men were convicted of the murder, but none served more than six years.

Here’s the poster for Schwerner, Goodman and Chaney before, acting on a tip, police officers found their bodies buried in an earthen dam:

Declaration of Independence

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Today’s American History Lesson:

** The Declaration of Independence wasn’t signed on July 4, 1776. **

On July 1, 1776, the Second Continental Congress met in Philadelphia, and on the following day 12 of the 13 colonies voted in favor of Richard Henry Lee’s motion for independence. The delegates then spent the next two days debating and revising the language of a statement drafted by Thomas Jefferson. On July 4, Congress officially adopted the Declaration of Independence, and as a result the date is celebrated as Independence Day. Nearly a month would go by, however, before the actual signing of the document took place. First, New York’s delegates didn’t officially give their support until July 9 because their home assembly hadn’t yet authorized them to vote in favor of independence. Next, it took two weeks for the Declaration to be “engrossed”—written on parchment in a clear hand. Most of the delegates signed on August 2, but several—Elbridge Gerry, Oliver Wolcott, Lewis Morris, Thomas McKean and Matthew Thornton—signed on a later date. (Two others, John Dickinson and Robert R. Livingston, never signed at all.) The signed parchment copy now resides at the National Archives in the Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom, alongside the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

#DeclarationOfIndependence #HistoryLesson

Today in Gay Rights

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A lot happened today in Gay Rights:

~ 2003 —> The U.S. Supreme Court rules in Lawrence v. Texas that gender-based sodomy laws are unconstitutional.

~ 2013 —> The U.S. Supreme Court ruled, 5–4, that Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional and in violation of the Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

~ 2015 —> The U.S. Supreme Court ruled, 5–4, that same-sex couples have a constitutional right to marriage under the 14th Amendment to the United States Constitution.

Stay tuned if any of these advancements in gay rights is overturned by the current makeup of the Supreme Court.

#GayRights #CivilRights

Civil Rights Workers Murdered 1964

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Today in American Southern History –> On this day in 1964 Three civil rights workers, Andrew Goodman, James Chaney and Mickey Schwerner, are murdered in Neshoba County, Mississippi, United States, by members of the Ku Klux Klan.

In 2005 Edgar Ray Killen, who had previously been unsuccessfully tried for the murders of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Mickey Schwerner, is convicted of manslaughter 41 years afterwards (the case had been reopened in 2004).

#Mississippi #KKK #Goodman #Chaney #Schwerner