Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Today in Suffragette History —> On November 12, 1815, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, spokesperson for the rights of women, was born in Johnstown, New York. Stanton formulated the philosophical basis of the woman suffrage movement, blazing a trail many feared to follow.

Stanton’s verbal brilliance combined with the organizational ability and mental focus of her lifelong collaborator Susan B. Anthony made the two women a formidable resource to the early cause.

Although Stanton served as president of the “radical” National Woman Suffrage Association and its successor the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA), she found it Increasingly difficult to maintain her leadership role. Interestingly, her agenda was far more radical than that of many younger, more conservative feminists.

Stanton’s belief that organized religion subjugated women alienated some supporters. In The Woman’s Bible, she brought considerable notoriety upon herself by criticizing the treatment of women in the Old Testament.

“The history of mankind is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations on the part of man toward woman, having in direct object the establishment of an absolute tyranny over her. To prove this, let facts be submitted to a candid world…wherever we turn, the history of woman is sad and dark, without any alleviating circumstances, nothing from which we can draw consolation.”
~ Elizabeth Cady Stanton, “Declaration of Sentiments.”

Sources: Library of Congress

Pictured: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, seated, and Susan B. Anthony, standing.
Pictured: Draft of Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s “Woman’s Bible” circa 1895

#Suffragette #Feminism #ElizabethCadyStanton

Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney Found Dead

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August 4th, 1964 civil rights workers Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney are found dead in Mississippi after disappearing on June 21.

The three men: two Jews and an African-American, epitomize the long-gone period when members of these two groups worked together (they were registering black voters in Mississippi: a capital crime!). Eventually seven men were convicted of the murder, but none served more than six years.

Here’s the poster for Schwerner, Goodman and Chaney before, acting on a tip, police officers found their bodies buried in an earthen dam.

Civil Rights Workers Murdered 1964

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On June 24th, 1964 Three civil rights workers, Andrew Goodman, James Chaney and Mickey Schwerner, are murdered in Neshoba County, Mississippi, United States, by members of the Ku Klux Klan.

In 2005 Edgar Ray Killen, who had previously been unsuccessfully tried for the murders of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Mickey Schwerner, is convicted of manslaughter 41 years afterwards (the case had been reopened in 2004).

#Mississippi #KKK #Goodman #Chaney #Schwerner